Monthly Archives: May 2015

Month Late

If you’ve been waiting for a blog entry from me, I’m sorry I’m a month late. Due to my wife’s epilepsy becoming something that has taken up a lot of my time and mind. I’ve been super slow to write or even work on my dream of being a screenwriter. I know many write no matter what goes on in their lives. I’ve been offered writing jobs (my own opinion), but scared to act. Am I good enough comes to mind, then what about my wife? Doctor’s visits driving here and there. Catch her when she falls, and take care of her. Feed her and just be there for her.

Then my mom says you’ve been blessed. I say no she said to take a look. We may not be debt free or do I have a bachelor’s degree, but bills are paid. We have a house. We got with government assistance a new furnace and A/C. We have food on the table. Our dogs are fed. We may not leave the house much or have friends beyond family. However, we are loved, and we love.
I know when I make it our lives will change drastically. We will be debt free. We will be able to give to those in our situation now. We will still be loved, and love others just have money to help our actions. We will leave our house, and we will still have our old farts (dogs).

I know everyone has their problems and their successes. I’m currently in a “many problems” in my life right now, but I know my successes are coming.

I hope to write more and write about success, but if not I hope to write more positive tidbits and thoughts about screenwriting and screenplays.


The only guide to writing a logline you’ll ever need – Part Three!

ERIC IAN STEELE

Welcome to the third and final part of a series of posts about how to write a logline. Whether you’re writing a novel or a screenplay, a logline is an important marketing tool. But with a little practice, anyone can create the perfect logline

Let’s go over what we’ve learned so far (and if you haven’t yet, I’d encourage you to read parts One and Two of this guide):

What is a logline?

A logline is a one or two sentence pitch for your story. 

What is a logline not?

A logline is not a tagline or a teaser. It summarizes the essential elements of the story so that someone can see at a glance what the story is about and whether it is marketable.

What does a logline contain?

A good logline contains as many of the following as possible:

A great TITLE. The GENRE. A HOOK…

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How to Fix Your Story Without Going Back to the Drawing Board

Drew Chial

1. TitleThe Case Against Editing as You Go

When I first started writing I scrutinized every paragraph the moment after typing. I counted the syllables so I could adjust for rhythm and flow. I checked my metaphors to see if they mixed wrong, I ran every verb through the thesaurus, and I dialed all my hyperboles back.

By the end of the day my word count hovered around the same number I’d started at. Sometimes it was in the negative. My effort to fine tune the perfect page kept me from finishing my stories.

Writing is hard. I was making it harder than it needed to be, writing the way I’d seen authors work on TV. They’d type THE END, pull the last page out of their typewriter, set it on top of the stack of pages, pat it, and hand the completed work to their publisher. Their publisher called them…

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Hiring A Script Consultant by Stage32.com Founder/CEO Richard “RB” Botto

FilmCourage.com

(Watch the video interview here)

Hiring A Script Consultant by Stage32.com Founder/CEO Richard “RB” Botto

via FilmCourage.com.

More video interviews at Film Courage Youtube

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What I Learned From My 2nd and 3rd Screenplays by Stage32.com Founder/CEO Richard “RB” Botto

FilmCourage.com

(Watch the video interview here)What I Learned From My 2nd and 3rd Screenplays by Stage32.com Founder/CEO Richard “RB” Bottovia FilmCourage.com.More video interviews at Film Courage Youtube

(Watch the video interview here)

What I Learned From My 2nd and 3rd Screenplays by Stage32.com Founder/CEO Richard “RB” Botto

via FilmCourage.com.

More video interviews at Film Courage Youtube

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Writing Like Alfred Hitchcock by Tony Lee Moral

Scriptangel's Blog

Alfred Hitchcock famously said that the three most vital elements of a film are ‘the script, the script, the script.’ He worked closely with his writers to construct the film, from the very beginning, on paper. Rarely would he take any writing credit himself, but guided his writers closely through every draft, paying attention to detail, with a preference towards telling the story through visual rather than verbal means.

Writing Like Alfred HitchcockHitchcock’s preferred writing collaborators were playwrights, novelists, screenwriters, and short story writers. When looking for source materials for his thrillers, he often turned to novels and short stories from established writers like John Buchan, Maxwell Anderson, Thornton Wilder and Patricia Highsmith.

As the author of three books on the Master of Suspense, including a ‘how to’ write a thriller, called Alfred Hitchcock’s Movie Making Masterclass, I was naturally inspired by his stories and screenwriters when constructing my screenplay, Playing Mrs…

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Creating Your Character Mix Using Temperament Theory by Phil Lowe

Scriptangel's Blog

After last month’s look at what drives your character, this time we’re back to the fundamentals of personality, thanks to an old chestnut that goes right back to the ancient Greeks – the idea that the human race can be divided into four temperaments (“temperament” being defined here as “a configuration of observable personality traits”). The most famous four-way classification came from Hippocrates, the father of medicine, who believed that an imbalance of bodily fluids (hold the “ewww”s, we’re not going there) caused each of us to be one of Choleric, Phlegmatic, Melancholic or Sanguine.

Character mix - Four temperamentsIn the 1970s David Keirsey and Marilyn Bates popularised temperament theory by linking it to arguably the most widely used personality questionnaire, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (also a favourite of writers). Presumably because of some drama of their own, Keirsey and Bates went their separate ways; for our purposes I’m going to use the…

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